Pediatric Vaccine Schedule
26 April

Why Vaccines Matter

Category: Pediatrics, Vaccination & Immunization

Vaccines matter more than you know. Print this vaccine schedule to keep up with your kid’s immunizations.

Immunization Schedule for Children & Adolescents Aged 18 Years or Younger

 

Age Birth

Vaccine

2 months

  • Hepatitis B vaccine (HepB)
  • HepB
  • DTaP: Diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccine
  • Hib: Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine
  • IPV: Inactivated poliovirus vaccine
  • PCV: Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine
  • RV: Rotavirus vaccine

4 months

  • DTaP
  • Hib
  • IPV
  • PCV
  • RV

6 months

  • HepB
  • IPV
  • DTaP
  • Hib:This third dose may be needed, depending on the brand of vaccine used in previous Hib immunizations.
  • PCV
  • RV:This third dose may be needed, depending on the brand of vaccine used in previous RV immunizations.

6 months and annually

  • Influenza (Flu): The flu vaccine is recommended every year for children 6 months and older.

12 months

  • HepA: Hepatitis A vaccine; given as two shots at least 6 months apart
  • MMR: Measles, mumps, and rubella (German measles) vaccine
  • PCV
  • Chickenpox (varicella)

15 months

  • DTaP
  • Hib

4 years

  • DTaP
  • MMR
  • IPV
  • Varicella

11 years

  • HPV: Human papillomavirus vaccine, given in two shots over a 6- to 12-month period. It can be given as early as age 9.
  • Tdap: Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis booster. Also recommended during each pregnancy a woman has.
  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine

16 years

  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine. Booster dose.
  • Meningococcal B vaccine (MenB): The MenB vaccine may be given to kids and teens in two or three doses, depending on the brand.

Call Legacy Community Health at 832-548-5000 to schedule your child’s vaccine or checkup.